Weaving a Little Magic

Weaving a Little Magic

The Eemsmond Building, in Deflzijl, Netherlands, was formerly a government owned-building, but was renovated and brought up to modern standards in 2008.  The concrete structure was built in 1969, and was known for its abstract concrete bas relief side facades, designed by artist Jaap van de Mey.  That artwork was left untouched, but the front and back facades were completely demolished and replaced with pre-fabricated timber-framed walls, on which new, composite façades were mounted..

Broadly-woven bands of shimmery cover across the entire front and back of the building, providing lattice-work awnings for the office windows behind.  This glass-fiber composite “woven” façade was designed by Team 4 Architects’ (Groningen) project architect Paul Klaas de Boer, and manufactured by Holland Composites using their Raficlad material. The panels were made by vacuum injection molding.  They are held in curved aluminum frames that help maintain their woven curvatures.

They perform a bit of optical magic, too.  They are faced with an inlay of Chameleon film from ChameleonLab, a dichroic material that appears in different colors depending on the light-angle and viewing-angle.  Because of the curved surfaces of the 1065 m2 facade, the chameleon film changes color as the viewer moves and changes her position relative to the building, as well as responding to the ever-changing angle of sunlight.

Images via Holland Composites, except as noted.