Living in Legos

Living in Legos

What is the minimal amount of space that a single human needs for basic daily activities?  China, the most populous nation on the planet, is finding out.  One expression of this quest is Micro House, designed by Studio Liu Lubin, Beijing, an assembly of three identically shaped fiber reinforced composite modules.  It measures just under  126 square feet.  The modules, shaped in an equal-armed cross, are 7.87 ft high and wide, and stackable.  The use of a single, repeated shape creates economies in production, and they are sized to fit well  in shipping containers.

The interior is designed so that every cubic centimeter of space is used, either for movement space or storage.  The central “multifunction” living space is flanked by two lower, dedicated spaces – kitchen and bathroom.  There is no interior connection between them, so the occupant would presumably have to go outside to move between rooms.  Woe to he! who forgets his towel in the bedroom and doesn’t realize it until after his shower.

A significant feature of the design is the ability to stack multiple units together into a community.

Under Chinese land-use laws, this design makes it possible for a single person to have his own home. The prototype was erected in a Beijing park as a demonstration.